Larabanga Mosque

Larabanga Mosque: Mosques associated with PILGRIMAGE Trade Routes of North Western Ghana of Islamic states of Wala, Dagbong, Gonja and Mamprugu notable are the Mosques of Larabanga and Wuribanga are part of UNESCO’s tentatively listed world heritage monuments in Ghana. The penetration of neo Sudanese influence following the Moroccan invasion of 1591 that saw the dissolution of Timbuktu and Gao with the battalions of Mande warriors following traders southwards led the formation of Islamic states such as Wala, Dagbong, Gonja and Mamprugu. Sudanic style mosques are therefore mostly concentrated in the Wala and Gonja states that lay directly on the trade routes of the Mande warriors, missionaries and traders. The buildings which are of Sudanic and Djenne types are made of mud bricks walls and mud roofs and the roofs made impervious by a mixture of cow-dung and laterite soil. Slopes are provided for drainage on the roofs. The Sudanic style mosques come with bush pole for stability which also serve as scaffolding during construction works on the building. An example is the Larabanga Mosque. The Djenne type a good example which is Wuribanga with its origin as Mali is rectangular shaped and has load bearing walls with a flat roof and surrounded by parapet

Larabanga Mosque

Wuriyanga Mosque